When Waffles Were a Favored Lenten Food

Did you know that waffles have a long and storied history—one that is closely tied to Lent?  I didn’t either until a friend of mine handed me a small story from her Lenten meditation pamphlet on waffles.

 

From the reading, I learned that bakers competing with monasteries who were baking thin wafers made of flour and water that people could eat during Lent first made waffles.

WAFFLE

During the Middle Ages, bakers decided to make their own version with a criss-cross design and called it a waffle. Over time, waffles gained in status, and in ingredients, as generally forbidden foods like eggs and cream were added to the recipe.

I have to share with you all that I eat waffles frequently, and by frequently I mean several times a week.  So it was no wonder that my friend saw the piece on waffles and thought immediately to hand it along to me. In fact, yesterday, I ate a waffle at the diner with this same friend!

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Today, waffles are a delicious food to eat during Lent.  Although, I have to say, after all I add to them, I better save them to eat on any day but a fasting Friday!

 

What are some of your favorite foods to eat during Fridays in Lent?  Please share with other readers!

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4 thoughts on “When Waffles Were a Favored Lenten Food”

  1. I eat pizza pretty much every Friday, Lent or not. So its no big deal to eliminate pepperoni and sausages during Lent and substitute olives or broccoli, which I both like on pizza. I also like pasta and Fish and Chips. So I don’t really eliminate anything I like. But is that really a sacrifice? I don’t know, but it works for me!

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    1. I guess we can both say we obey the letter of the law but not the spirit of the law. Which is good in a way, and also bad in another way, for us! What do you think?

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  2. I never knew waffles had a Lenten history either. I love them, I have Eggo waffles most mornings. Buttermilk and blueberry are my favorite kind 🙂

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